World Rural Health Conference
Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
Users Online: 278
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 64-68

Socio-demographic and racial differences in acute coronary syndrome: Comparison between Saudi and South Asian patients


Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Mazen Ferwana
King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, P.O. Box 22490, Mail code 3120, Riyadh-11426
Saudi Arabia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2249-4863.109950

Rights and Permissions

Introduction: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is the leading cause of death in Saudi Arabia as elsewhere. Although, many studies found that South Asians had increased rates of ACS, others did not. The aim of the study is to explore the extent of difference between South Asians and Saudi presentation and risk factors of ACS patients. Materials and Methods: All patients who were diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction (AMI) based on World Health Organization (WHO) criteria in 6 month period were included in the study. Results: A total of 190 patients confirmed ACS were included; 121 (63.70%) were Saudi, 50 (26.3%) were South Asians, and 19 (10.0%) were other Arab nationalities. The mean age was 53.9 (SD 14.6). Out of the total South Asians 82% had normal body mass index (BMI) ( P = 0.000). Saudi patients were the lowest of the three groups who smoked cigarette and/or shisha (26.6%; P = 0.000). 52.9% of Saudi patients were diabetics and 41.3% were hypertensive ( P = 0.004). More South Asians were presented with chest pain (94% vs 76%). Discussion: South Asians had a double rate of ACS incidence; they were younger, lower socio-economic status, more cigarette smokers, and less diabetics and hypertensive than other patients. An association between the apolipoprotein E (apoE) genotype with the incidence of ACS in young South Asian is proposed. Conclusion: South Asians had double rate of ACS incidence; they were younger, lower socio-economic status, more cigarette smokers, and less diabetics and hypertensive than other patients.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1501    
    Printed86    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded250    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal