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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 374-378

Pyoderma gangrenosum: A commonly overlooked ulcerative condition


1 Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228
2 Department of Dermatology, Changi General Hospital Singapore, Singapore 529889
3 Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228; Department of Dermatology, Changi General Hospital Singapore, Singapore 529889

Correspondence Address:
Yong-Kwang Tay
Department of Dermatology, Changi General Hospital Singapore, 2 Simei Street 3, Singapore 529889

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2249-4863.148113

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Background: Pyoderma ga ngrenosum (PG) is a rare, inflammatory, destructive neutrophilic dermatosis, which mimics other ulcerative conditions. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study based on patients diagnosed with PG over a 3-year period (2010-2013), we evaluated demographics, anatomical sites, number of lesions, subtypes, histopathology, associated conditions, treatment regimens, healing time, and recurrence. Results: Of our five patients, there were three males and two females, age ranging between 19 and 58 years (mean age 38 years). Four had single lesions localized to the lower limbs while one had multiple lesions (more than five) over bilateral hands and legs. Ulcerative subtype was observed in all the patients. One exhibited pathergy. Skin biopsies were done in four patients, revealing dense neutrophilic infiltrates in three cases and leukocytoclastic vasculitis in one. Associated systemic diseases were observed in all patients, four having inflammatory bowel disease and one having both systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-phospholipid syndrome. The patients were all treated with systemic corticosteroids either alone or in combination with immunosuppressants (e.g., azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus), and wound dressing. Split-thickness skin graft was done in one patient. Complete healing was achieved in all patients, ranging from one to 3 months after diagnosis. No recurrence was reported. Conclusions: Systemic corticosteroids, either alone or in combination with steroid-sparing agents are the mainstay of treatment. Should family physicians encounter a rapidly progressing ulcer that has poor response to usual wound management, timely referral to dermatology should be made.


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