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COMMENTARY
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 200-202

Addressing inequalities in oral health in India: need for skill mix in the dental workforce


1 Public Health Foundation of India, Gurgaon, Haryana, India
2 Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
3 Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Manu Raj Mathur
Public Health Foundation of India, Plot No. 47, Sector 44, Institutional Area, Gurgaon, Haryana - 122 002
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2249-4863.154632

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Dentistry has always been an under-resourced profession. There are three main issues that dentistry is facing in the modern era. Firstly, how to rectify the widely acknowledged geographical imbalance in the demand and supply of dental personnel, secondly, how to provide access to primary dental care to maximum number of people, and thirdly, how to achieve both of these aims within the financial restraints imposed by the central and state governments. The trends of oral diseases have changed significantly in the last 20 years. The two of the most common oral diseases that affect a majority of the population worldwide, namely dental caries and periodontitis, have been proved to be entirely preventable. Even for life-threatening oral diseases like oral cancer, the best possible available treatment is prevention. There is a growing consensus that appropriate skill mix can prove very beneficial in providing these preventive dental care services to the public and aid in achieving the goal of universal oral health coverage. Professions complementary to dentistry (PCD) have been found to be effective in reducing inequalities in oral health, improving access and spreading the messages of health promotion across entire spectrum of socio-economic hierarchy in various studies conducted globally. This commentary provides a review of the effectiveness of skill mix in dentistry and a reflection on how this can be beneficial in achieving universal oral health care in India.


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