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CASE REPORT
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 873-874

Late onset hydrocephalus in children with tuberculous meningitis


Pediatrics TB Clinic, B.J. Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Disha Sharma
603, UGPG Girls Hostel, KEM Hospital Campus, Parel, Mumbai - 400 012, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2249-4863.201145

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Hydrocephalus is a known complication of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). It is almost always present in patients who have had the disease for four to six weeks. However, hydrocephalus can also develop later in the disease course as seen in our 3 patients. All 3 patients had multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) and developed hydrocephalus after variable time after starting second line anti-tuberculous therapy (ATT). A 7 years old girl had hydrocephalus at onset of TBM and was shunted but the hydrocephalus increased in size after 6 months of being on second line ATT in spite of a patent ventricular peritoneal (VP) shunt. Hydrocephalus responded to oral acetazolamide. Other 2 patients, a 2 years old girl and 3½ years old boy developed hydrocephalus after being on treatment for 14 months. Both required insertion of VP shunt. Thus, in patients with MDR-TB, hydrocephalus may develop as late onset phenomenon and a neurological examination would be essential in each visit to the hospital.


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