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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 136-140

Hand hygiene knowledge of primary health care workers in Abha city, South Western Saudi Arabia


1 Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha 62523, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha 62523; Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516, Egypt
3 General Directorate of Infection Prevention and Control in Healthcare Facilities, Ministry of Health, Riyadh 12628, Saudi Arabia
4 Aseer General Directorate of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, Abha 62523, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Ahmed A Mahfouz
Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha, P.O. Box 641
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2249-4863.214971

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Purpose: The aim of this is to find out the hand hygiene (HH) knowledge among primary health care workers (PHCWs) in Abha health district, southwestern Saudi Arabia. Methods: Data were collected through an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire was based on a WHO “Knowledge Questionnaire for Health Care Workers.” Results: The study included 478 PHCWs (239 males and 239 females). The sample included 186 physicians, 212 nurses, and 80 technicians. The highest proportion receiving formal training was nurses (82.1%). Females (77.4%) received significantly more training than males (70.3%). Only 59.2% (283) of the HCWs properly identified unclean hands of HCWs as the main route of the cross. Only 26.4% (126) of the HCWs properly identified germs already present on or within the patient as the most frequent source of pathogens in a health-care facility. Only 54.8% (262) of HCWs properly identified 20 s as the minimal time needed for alcohol-based hand rub to kill most germs on hands. Conclusion: The study revealed gaps in the knowledge regarding HH. To promote HH at primary health care setting, WHO bundle of multimodal strategies should be adopted including system change; training/education; evaluation and feedback; reminders in the workplace; and institutional safety climate.


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