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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 502-508

Acute coronary syndrome-related mortality audit in a teaching hospital at Port Blair, India


1 Department of Medicine, Andaman and Nicobar Islands Institute of Medical Sciences, Port Blair, Andaman and Nicobar Islands
2 Department of Community Medicine, Andaman and Nicobar Islands Institute of Medical Sciences, Port Blair, Andaman and Nicobar Islands

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Swapan Kumar Paul
Department of Community Medicine, Andaman and Nicobar Islands Institute of Medical Sciences, Port Blair, Andaman and Nicobar Islands

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2249-4863.222033

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Background: India has a growing trend of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) due to shifting lifestyle. Objective: To study the profile of patients died due to AMI and to find its risk correlates. Methods: A study was conducted on consecutive AMI cases admitted in the teaching hospital at Port Blair from April 2011 to March 2016. During inpatients management, outcomes were followed up from admission till discharge or expiry. Results: Of the total 491 cases, majority (75.99%) had ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI); mean age of 73 deaths was 58.01 ± 13.60, mortality probability among females was less; in the age group 41–50 years the case fatality rate was the lowest (7.58%). Mean age of survival was 56.75 ± 10.47; great majorities were males across all age groups in cases and deaths; highest number of cases were in the age group 51–60 (34.21%); reportedly 83.10% had some physical activities; 6.52% were vegetarian; 34.22% were smokers; 10.39% had family history of AMI, majority (59.06%) were from white collar profession (teacher, clerical, etc.); 52.95% were diabetics; and 47.45% were hypertensives. Lifestyle-related risk factors, physical activity, and vegetarian diet were not protective; family history and addiction to smoking were significantly associated with AMI deaths. Thrombolytic intervention helped the survival of 73.68%, and the odds ratio of survival showed benefit. Conclusions: Acute STEMI had male and middle-age predominance with a common risk factor of family history, smoking, diabetes, and hypertension.


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