World Rural Health Conference
Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
Users Online: 2093
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 791-794

Fatal carbon monoxide poisoning: A lesson from a retrospective study at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi


1 Department of Forensic Medicine, ESIC Medical College, Faridabad, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India
3 Department of Forensic Medicine, All Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Asit Kumar Sikary
Department of Forensic Medicine, ESIC Medical College, NIT 3, Faridabad, Haryana
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_408_16

Rights and Permissions

Background: Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, and nonirritating gas which makes it difficult for those who are exposed, to detect it, leading to unexpected death. This study was undertaken to see the pattern of fatal CO poisoning and to discuss preventive aspect. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective descriptive study of fatal CO cases which were autopsied at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, from the year 2010 to the year 2015. The cases were analyzed as per age groups, circumstances of death, season of death, and sources of CO formation. Results and Discussion: The study involved 40 cases of fatal CO poisoning. About 80% of cases were reported in winter months. The maximum cases were reported in the month of January followed by November and December. All the cases except one, died with a source of CO nearby and the person was inside a room or some closed space without ventilation. Source of CO was firepot and electric room heater in most of the cases. Some cases were of CO build inside the car with a running engine. Most of the cases occurred accidentally. Conclusion: Clustering of cases is seen in winters. Poisoning can occur in different ways. The study documents the various possibilities of CO poisoning and advocates community education targeting the high-risk groups and masses, especially during the winter season.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1081    
    Printed7    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded108    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal