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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 10  |  Page : 3313-3317

Prevalence of hypothyroidism among chronic kidney disease patients in security force hospital (SFH) in Saudi Arabia


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Prince Mohammed Medical City, Aljouf, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Nephrology, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Endocrinology, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
5 Department of Internal Medicine, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
6 Pulmonary and Critical Care Department, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Faisal Alshammari
Internal Medicine, Prince Mohammed Medical City, P.O. Box: 2254 Sakaka, Aljouf - 42421
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_641_19

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Introduction: Impairment in kidney function leads to disturbed thyroid physiology. All levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis may be involved, including alterations in hormone production, distribution, and excretion, and even CKD progress with hypothyroidism. Aim of Work: To assess the prevalence of hypothyroidism among chronic kidney disease patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in the nephrology department of security forces hospital from January 2015 to February 2018. Biochemical tests (includes blood urea, serum creatinine, PTH, total T4, TSH) were carried out to all participants. Results: Out of 255 CKD patients in the present study, 166 patients had no hypothyroidism, 43 had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 46 had hypothyroidism. The percentage of hypothyroidism among CKD patients was 34.9%, including dialysis patients and 17.66% after exclusion. Out of 24 peritoneal dialysis patients in the current study (P = 0.03), 7 had subclinical hypothyroidism and another 7 had hypothyroidism. In addition, out of 139 hemodialysis patients (P = 0.02), 20 patients had subclinical hypothyroidism and 18 had hypothyroidism. The majority (67.36%) of CKD patients were in CKD stage 5 and had no hypothyroidism (45.10%). Only 29 (11.37%) patients in CKD stage 5 had hypothyroidism and 28 (10.89%) patients had subclinical hypothyroidism. T4 was higher in nondialysis patients, whereas TSH and PTH were higher in dialysis patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of hypothyroidism among chronic kidney disease patients was high and increased with the decrease in estimated GFR.


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