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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 10  |  Page : 3345-3349

Does aging have an impact on hemoglobin? Study in elderly population at rural teaching hospital


1 Department of Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Opthalamology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nitin Raisinghani
Department of Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_668_19

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Background: The prevalence of anemia increases with age. Some serious underlying conditions may lead to anemia in the old age. The present study was undertaken to detect and do morphological typing of anemia and further delineate etiological factors in elderly patients. Methods: In this hospital-based prevalence study carried out a tertiary care center over one and half years, a total of 90 patients were fully evaluated for etiology and typing of anemia in elderly (>60 years age) patients. Details of other significant medical and surgical history were noted. Laboratory investigations were conducted, which included complete hemogram, peripheral blood smear, reticulocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate estimation, serum urea, serum creatinine and serum lactate dehydrogenase, bone marrow examination (with Prussian blue marrow iron staining), serum iron and serum total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin, and stool and urine examination. Results: The mean hemoglobin as per age was 60–64 years- 5.95 gm%, 65–69 years - 6.7 gm%, 70–74 years - 6.58 gm%, and 75–79 years - 6.87 gm%. The difference not being significant (p = 0.33). Morphologically, 53 patients (24 males and 29 females) had microcytic anemia, 27 (17 males and 10 females) had normocytic anemia, and 10 (8 males and 2 females) had macrocytic anemia. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) was the most common occurrence (50, 55.56%), followed by iron deficiency anemia (IDA) (27, 30%), macrocytic anemia (9, 10%), and others 4 (4.44%). The cause of anemia was found in 10 out of 27 (37.03%) patients in the IDA group, 28 out of 50 (56%) in the ACD group, whereas the etiology was discernible in only one out of nine cases (11.1%) of macrocytic anemias. Conclusion: There was no significant difference observed in the mean hemoglobin levels as the age increased. Morphologically, the majority of the patients had microcytic anemia, followed by normocytic anemia. A population-based study is recommended for further assessment of the prevalence and causes of anemias in asymptomatic elderly subjects.


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