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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 3496-3503

The role of gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and the therapeutic effects of probiotics


1 Dermatology Resident, Alnoor Specialist Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
2 Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
3 Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
4 General Practitioner, Consultant Center for Dermatology and Venereology Clinics, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
5 Faculty of Medicine, Albaha University, Albaha, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Yahya A Alzahrani
Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_709_19

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The adult intestine hosts a huge number of diverse bacterial species, collectively referred to as the microbiome, that reside mainly in the lower gut, where they maintain a symbiotic relationship with their host. Recent research points to a central role of the microbiome in many biological processes. These microbial communities are influenced by multiple environmental and dietary factors and can modulate immune responses. In addition to local effects on the gastrointestinal tract, the microbiota is associated with effects on other organs and tissues, such as the skin. Indeed, an altered microbiome has been associated with skin disorders in several instances. Thus, in this review, we describe the recent advances regarding the interplay between gut microbiota and the skin. We explore how this potential link affects skin homeostasis and its influence on modulating the cutaneous immune response, focusing on psoriasis disorder. Finally, we discuss how to take advantage of this interplay to manage this disorder, particularly through probiotics administration. In the gastrointestinal tract, the microbiome has been proven to be important in the maintenance of the balance between effector T cells and regulatory T cells, and the induction of immunoglobulin A. Moreover, gut bacterial dysbiosis is associated with chronic inflammatory disorders of the skin, such as psoriasis. Thus, the microbiome can be considered an effective therapeutical target for treating this disorder. Despite some limitations, interventions with probiotics seem promising for the development of a preventive therapy by restoring altered microbiome functionality or as an adjuvant in specific immunotherapy.


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