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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 1151-1158

Smoking cessation education and training in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs in the United States


1 Department of Nursing, Lourdes University, Sylvania, OH, USA
2 Department of Public Health, The School of Population Health, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA
3 Department of Health Education, The School of Population Health, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA
4 Department of Health Science, College of Health, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jagdish Khubchandani
Department of Health Science, College of Health, Ball State University, Muncie, IN
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_451_18

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Background: OB/GYN physicians should be involved in providing smoking cessation counseling to their patients who smoke, especially pregnant patients. However, the smoking cessation practices of OB/GYN physicians seem to be dependent on their education and training and not much is known about their training during medical school. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the smoking cessation education provided by OB/GYN residency training programs in the United States. Methods: The investigators developed and mailed a valid and reliable survey to all allopathic and osteopathic OB/GYN Residency Directors in the US (n = 275). The internal reliability coefficients (Cronbach alpha) for the four major subscales ranged from 0.63 to 0.90. Best practices in survey research were used to achieve a final response rate of 58%. Results: The majority of residency programs (60%) did not have a formal, structured curriculum in tobacco topics and/or smoking cessation. In contrast, 40% of programs reported having a formal, structured tobacco education curriculum. Sixty-five percent of programs did not formally evaluate residents' competence in providing smoking cessation counseling to patients. A range of 42% to 57% of residency programs reported spending less than one hour/year on teaching various basic science and clinical science topics related to tobacco use. The majority of residency programs spent no time teaching residents about the socio-political aspects of tobacco use cessation. Lack of teaching time was identified by the majority (51%) of the residency directors as a barrier to teaching smoking cessation. Conclusion: Although OB/GYN physicians are expected to provide smoking cessation counseling to their patients, the majority of OB/GYN residency programs in the United States provide minimal education and training in this area. Therefore, continuing medical education on smoking cessation counseling should be broadly implemented for OB/GYN physicians.


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