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 Table of Contents 
CASE REPORT
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 1284-1286  

Congenital dilatation of the nasolacrimal sac (Dacryocystocele): Case report


1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology №1, Marat Ospanov, West Kazakhstan State Medical University, Aktobe, Kazakhstan
2 Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
3 Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; Ahmadi Hospital, Kuwait Oil Company, Ahmadi, Kuwait

Date of Web Publication27-Mar-2019

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Ibrahim A Abdelazim
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt and Ahmadi Kuwait Oil (KOC) Company Hospital, Ahmadi

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_17_19

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  Abstract 


Congenital dacryocystoceles are usually diagnosed in the third trimester by parental ultrasound as a cystic lesion adjacent to the medial and inferior aspects of the fetal orbit. A considerable number of dacryocystocele are bilateral and resolve spontaneously in utero and/or immediately after delivery. Persistent dacryocystoceles need ophthalmological consultation to avoid the possible potential complications. This case report represents a case of congenital dacryocystocele diagnosed by antenatal 2D and 3D ultrasounds, which disappeared spontaneously 2 days after birth. To highlight that, the diagnosis of congenital dacryocystoceles is important to avoid additional postnatal diagnostic techniques and to manage the potential postnatal complications.

Keywords: Congenital, dacryocystocele, dilatation, nasolacrimal


How to cite this article:
Kanshaiym S, El-Din MH, Abdelazim IA, Hamed ME, Starchenko T. Congenital dilatation of the nasolacrimal sac (Dacryocystocele): Case report. J Family Med Prim Care 2019;8:1284-6

How to cite this URL:
Kanshaiym S, El-Din MH, Abdelazim IA, Hamed ME, Starchenko T. Congenital dilatation of the nasolacrimal sac (Dacryocystocele): Case report. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Jun 17];8:1284-6. Available from: http://www.jfmpc.com/text.asp?2019/8/3/1284/254858




  Introduction Top


Congenital dacryocystoceles are usually diagnosed in the third trimester by parental ultrasound as a cystic lesion adjacent to the medial and inferior aspects of the fetal orbit.[1]

A considerable number of dacryocystocele are bilateral and resolve spontaneously in utero and/or immediately after delivery.[1],[2]

Persistent dacryocystoceles need ophthalmological consultation to avoid the possible potential complications.[2]


  Case Report Top


A 38-year old, 34-week pregnant female was diagnosed with fetal right-sided cystic lesion adjacent to the medial and inferior aspects of the fetal orbit (dacryocystocele) [Figure 1].
Figure 1: The prenatal two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound diagnosis of dacryocystocele

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The 2D ultrasound diagnosis of dacryocystocele was confirmed by the 3D ultrasound scan [Figure 2] and at birth by a bluish cystic swelling below the medial canthal area [Figure 3].
Figure 2: The prenatal three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound diagnosis of dacryocystocele

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Figure 3: Dacryocystocele appears as a bluish cystic swelling below the medial canthal area

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The dacryocystocele of the studied case disappeared spontaneously 2 days after birth.


  Discussion Top


Dacryocystocele usually resolves spontaneously before birth in 50% of cases. Bilateral dacryocystocele may have intranasal extension and may cause respiratory distress.[1],[2]

Persistent epiphora, conjunctivitis, cellulitis and airway obstruction can occur in cases of persistent dacryocystoceles (bilateral cases).[2]

The 3D ultrasound is helpful to confirm the diagnosis of dacryocystoceles and to avoid additional postnatal diagnostic techniques.[2]

Rogister et al. reported three newborns with dacryocystoceles, one of them developed respiratory distress (bilateral dacryocystoceles) and was managed by marsupialization.[3]

Durmaz et al. reported a case of congenital bilateral dacryocystoceles with intranasal extension in a 3-day old newborn presented with respiratory distress and managed by endoscopic marsupialization.[4] Yin et al. reported a successful management of bilateral dacryocystoceles in a 5-day old girl.[5]

Bachelard-Serra et al. reported three cases of congenital bilateral dacryocystocele diagnosed prenatally by an ultrasound. Two of them developed respiratory distress and were managed by marsupialization.[6]

An initial conservative management of congenital dacryocystocele may be considered, but the surgical management is recommended if there is persistent respiratory obstruction.[7] Sarbajna et al. reported that the endoscopic marsupialization is an effective surgical management for congenital dacryocystocele.[8]

This case report represents a case of congenital dacryocystocele diagnosed by antenatal 2D and 3D ultrasounds, which disappeared spontaneously 2 days after birth. To highlight that, the diagnosis of congenital dacryocystoceles is important to avoid additional postnatal diagnostic techniques and to manage the potential postnatal complications.


  Conclusion Top


Diagnosis of congenital dacryocystoceles is important to avoid additional postnatal diagnostic techniques and to manage the potential postnatal complications.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient has given her consent for her and her child images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that her and her child names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal her and her child identities, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to the studied woman and for her agreement and consent to participate in this case report (signed consent taken from the studied woman).

Financial support and sponsorship

The case report was funded by the authors themselves.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Malpas T, Nelson F, MacLachlan N. Prenatal diagnosis of dacryocystocele. Prenat Diagn 2009;29:546.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Sepulveda W, Wojakowski AB, Elias D, Otaño L, Gutierrez J. Congenital dacryocystocele: Prenatal 2- and 3-dimensional sonographic findings. J Ultrasound Med 2005;24:225-30.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Rogister F, Goffart Y, Daele J. Management of congenital dacryocystocele: Report of 3 clinical cases. B-ENT 2016;12:83-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Durmaz A, Yildizoǧlu Ü, Arslan F, Uysal Y. Bilateral dacryocystocele with an intranasal cyst as the cause of respiratory distress in a newborn. B-ENT 2016;12:23-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Yin T, van der Meer G. Neonatal airway obstruction in bilateral congenital dacryocystocoele: Case report and review of the literature. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2017;92:161-4.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Bachelard-Serra M, Chau C, Farinetti A, Roman S, Triglia JM, Nicollas R. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital dacryocystocele. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2013;77:847-9.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Carneiro de Sousa P, Neves M, Duarte D, Azevedo P. Congenital bilateral dacryocystocele. Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis 2018. pii: S1879-7296(18)30159-5. doi: 10.1016/j.anorl. 2017.10.006.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Sarbajna T, Takahashi Y, Paula Valencia MR, Ana-Magadia MG, Ishikawa E, Kakizaki H. Dacryoendoscopy-assisted nasal endoscopic marsupialization for congenital dacryocystocele. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2018;115:54-7.  Back to cited text no. 8
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]



 

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