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AFPI POSITION PAPER ON ROAD SAFETY AND PUBLIC HEALTH
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 775-783

Public health crisis of road traffic accidents in India: Risk factor assessment and recommendations on prevention on the behalf of the Academy of Family Physicians of India


1 Department of Community Medicine, Venereology and Leprosy, MGM Medical College and LSK Hospital, Kishanganj, Bihar, India
2 Department of Biochemistry, Medical College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
3 Academy of Family Physicians of India, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
4 Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL, USA
5 Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, MGM Medical College and LSK Hospital, Kishanganj, Bihar, India
6 High Court at Calcutta and The Supreme Court of India, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
7 Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
8 Neurosurgery-Critical Care, RED LATINO, Organización Latinoamericana de Trauma y cuidado, Neurointensivo, Bogota, Colombia
9 Department of Neurosurgery, Narayana Medical College Hospital, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Ranabir Pal
Department of Community Medicine, MGM Medical College and LSK Hospital, Kishanganj - 855 107, Bihar
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_214_18

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Roads are considered a sign of development bringing colossal benefits to community as socioeconomic and logistic facilitator. Yet, growth of road network has brought road crashes leading to civic pain from premature deaths of productive age group. In 2017, 16 citizens were killed and 53 injured every hour on Indian roads as per officially reported data, while a fair number go unreported. This is unacceptably high when compared with international standards. Risk correlates of road traffic injuries (RTIs) need to be redefined so as to form a continuum with other confounding factors that impact to take lives on road. Risk factors impacting RTIs vary from human components to the roles and responsibilities of healthcare stakeholders. We should have made roads safer for all citizens because a large percentage of population – children, pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists, and the elderly – are most vulnerable. A taskforce was set up by the Academy of Family Physicians of India to scientifically analyze the literature available to assess risks and put forward appropriate recommendations.


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