World Rural Health Conference
Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
Users Online: 884
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1599-1601

Can identification badges be vectors of infection: Experience from a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia


1 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Medicine, Dar Al Uloom University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Medicine, Majmaah University, Al Majmaah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Alwaleed Alyamani
King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_173_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Wearing identification badges is mandatory in many hospitals. Identification badges worn by healthcare workers may be contaminated with pathogens. Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the levels and types of contamination on identification badges of healthcare workers at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 200 healthcare workers at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A data collection form was handed to all the participants and swab cultures of their identification badges were taken. Results: A total of 200 identification badges were sampled in this study. 37% were contaminated with pathogens. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was isolated from 70 badges (35%), and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus from four badges (2%). Contamination was highest in physicians (45% compared to 14–32% in other healthcare workers). Males and females had similar contamination rates (39 and 36%, respectively). Conclusion: Identification badges worn by healthcare workers may be vectors of significant infection. We suggest more compliance of infection control measures in regards to disinfecting badges or personal belongings of healthcare workers.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed207    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded23    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal