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 Table of Contents 
CASE REPORT
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1804-1806  

Short-term monotherapy with Liraglutide for weight management: A case study


Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Shaqra University, Shaqra, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Date of Web Publication31-May-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Feras Almarshad
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Shaqra University, Shaqra
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_213_19

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  Abstract 


Background: Liraglutide 3 mg was approved by the FDA as an antiobesity drug. A recent study reported that short-term treatment with Liraglutide (20.0 ± 6.4 days) reduces body weight. Case Presentation: A 35-year-old male not having any medical illness was presented for medical weight-loss management. He was taking Liraglutide (Saxenda) by SC solution multidose pen 0.6 mg in the first week, 1.2 mg in the second week, 1.8 mg in the third week, 2.4 mg in the fourth week, and 3.0 mg in the fifth week, i.e. 0.6-mg dose increase per week. During the treatment period, he was maintained on low-calorie diet, which was not exceeded 1,500 calories/day. During the treatment period, he was on the mild exercise of walking 45 min three times per week. His initial anthropometric measurements include a weight of 118 kg, height 171 cm, and body mass index 40.4. Conclusion: Short-term (05 weeks) monotherapy with Liraglutide with restricted-calorie diet and mild exercise significantly reduces the weight by 13.55%.

Keywords: Glucagon-like peptide-1, Liraglutide, obesity, weight loss


How to cite this article:
Almarshad F. Short-term monotherapy with Liraglutide for weight management: A case study. J Family Med Prim Care 2019;8:1804-6

How to cite this URL:
Almarshad F. Short-term monotherapy with Liraglutide for weight management: A case study. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 16];8:1804-6. Available from: http://www.jfmpc.com/text.asp?2019/8/5/1804/259421




  Background Top


Liraglutide has a dose-dependent dual beneficial effect. It improves glucose homeostasis and reduces body weight. Antidiabetic therapy is approved at doses up to 1.8 mg,[1],[2] whereas higher doses are required for maximum weight reduction.[3],[4] Liraglutide 3 mg led to decreases in body weight of >5% to as much as 15%[5] and was recently approved for weight management in many countries. Exposure to higher doses was not linked with deterioration in safety when compared with lower doses but to a potential higher frequency of gastrointestinal side effects.[6] Liraglutide at doses up to 1.8 mg once daily (Victoza®, Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) has been licensed for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes (T2D) since 2009. More recently, Liraglutide 3.0 mg (Saxenda®; Novo Nordisk), as an adjunct to a reduced® calorie diet and increased physical activity, has been approved for weight management in the United States, European Union, and elsewhere.

Treatment with Liraglutide 3.0 mg contributes to improved cardiometabolic parameters and health-related quality of life scores.[7],[8] Our aim of this case study was to evaluate the short-term (05 weeks) monotherapy and effects of Liraglutide on weight loss in adult person.


  Case Presentation Top


A 35-year-old male not having any medical illness was presented for medical weight-loss management. He was taking Liraglutide (Saxenda) by SC solution multidose pen 0.6 mg in the first week, 1.2 mg in the second week, 1.8 mg in the third week, 2.4 mg in the fourth week, and 3.0 mg in the fifth week, i.e. 0.6 mg dose increase per week. During the treatment period, he was maintained on low-calorie diet, which was not exceeded 1,500 calories/day. During the treatment period, he was on the mild exercise of walking 45 min three times per week. His initial anthropometric measurements include a weight of 118 kg, height 171 cm, and body mass index (BMI) 40.4.

After 45 days, the weight of the patient was 102 kg and BMI was 34.9 [Figure 1] and [Table 1]. There was 13.55% weight loss occurs within 45 days with Liraglutide, low-calorie diet, and mild exercise. There was no remarkable blood analysis, urine analysis, lipid profile, and liver function tests were found.
Figure 1: Weight reduction

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Table 1: Initial and after treatment laboratory parameters of the patient

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  Discussion and Conclusion Top


A 5%–10% reduction in body weight in overweight and obese individuals improves several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including elevated blood glucose, blood pressure, and plasma triglyceride concentrations.[9],[10],[11] Liraglutide, with low-calorie diet and mild exercise, maintained weight loss achieved and induced further weight loss over 56 weeks. Improvements in some CVD risk factors were also observed. Liraglutide 3 mg/day was useful for improving the maintenance of lost weight. Liraglutide, compared with placebo, improved weight maintenance and induced additional reductions in CVD risk factors including waist circumference.[12] In two double-blind studies, adding Liraglutide to lifestyle counseling for 1 year resulted in an average 8.9- to 13.3-lb (4–6 kg) greater weight loss in >3,000 obese or overweight patients with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, or diabetes.[13],[14],[15],[16]

Our objective was to evaluate the effect of short-term use (05 weeks) of Liraglutide in weight loss. The above case revealed that the short-term use of Liraglutide up to 3-mg dose started with 0.6 mg/day and increased by 0.6 mg in every week up to 3 mg with restricted-calorie diet and mild exercise results in 13.55% weight loss.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful to Shaqra University, Ministry of Education, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, for providing a platform to encourage research and developments among the students, staff, and society.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Jensterle M, Kravos NA, Goričar K, Janez A. Short-term effectiveness of low dose liraglutide in combination with metformin versus high dose liraglutide alone in treatment of obese PCOS: Randomized trial. BMC Endocr Disord 2017;17:1-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Blonde L, Russell-Jones D. The safety and efficacy of liraglutide with or without oral antidiabetic drug therapy in type 2 diabetes: An overview of the LEAD 1–5 studies. Diabetes Obes Metab 2009;11:26-34.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Astrup A, Rossner S, Van Gaal L, Rissanen A, Niskanen L, Al Hakim M, et al. Effects of liraglutide in the treatment of obesity: A randomised, doubleblind, placebo-controlled study. Lancet 2009;374:1606-16.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Davies MJ, Bergenstal R, Bode B, Kushner RF, Lewin A, Skjoth TV, et al. Efficacy of liraglutide for weight loss among patients with type 2 diabetes the SCALE diabetes randomized clinical trial. JAMA 2015;314:687-99.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Vilsboll T, Christensen M, Junker AE, Knop FK, Gluud LL. Effects of glucagonlike peptide-1 receptor agonists on weight loss: Systematic review and meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials. BMJ 2012;344:d7771.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Wilding JP, Overgaard RV, Jacobsen LV, Jensen CB, le Roux CW. Exposure response analyses of liraglutide 3.0 mg for weight management. Diabetes Obes Metab 2016;18:491-9.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Bays H, Pi-Sunyer X, Hemmingsson JU, Claudius B, Jensen CB, Van Gaal L. Liraglutide 3.0 mg for weight management: Weight-loss dependent and independent effects. Curr Med Res Opin 2017;33:225-9.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Fujioka K, O'Neil PM, Davies M, Greenway F, C W Lau D, Claudius B, et al. Early weight loss with liraglutide 3.0 mg predicts 1-year weight loss and is associated with improvements in clinical markers. Obesity (Silver Spring) 2016;24:2278-88.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
World Health Organization. Obesity: Preventing and Managing the Global Epidemic. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 1998.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
National Institutes of Health. Clinical guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults--The evidence report. Obes Res 1998;6(Suppl 2):51S-209S.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Research Group. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP): Description of lifestyle intervention. Diabetes Care 2002;25:2165-71.  Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.
Wadden TA, Hollander P, Klein S, Niswender K, Woo V, Hale PM, Aronne L. Weight maintenance and additional weight loss with liraglutide after low-calorie-diet-induced weight loss: The SCALE Maintenance randomized study. Int J Obes (Lond) 2013;37:1443-51.  Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.
Davies MJ, Bergenstal R, Bode B, Kushner RF, Lewin A, Skjøth TV, et al. Efficacy of liraglutide for weight loss among patients with type 2 diabetes: the SCALE diabetes randomized clinical trial. JAMA 2015;314:687-99.  Back to cited text no. 13
    
14.
Pi-Sunyer X, Astrup A, Fujioka K, Greenway F, Halpern A, Krempf M, et al. A randomized, controlled trial of 3.0 mg of liraglutide in weight management. N Engl J Med 2015;373:11-22.  Back to cited text no. 14
    
15.
Lean ME, Carraro R, Finer N, Hartvig H, Lindegaard ML, Rössner S, et al. Tolerability of nausea and vomiting and associations with weight loss in a randomized trial of liraglutide in obese, non-diabetic adults. Int J Obes (Lond) 2014;38:689-97.  Back to cited text no. 15
    
16.
Whitten JS. Liraglutide (Saxenda) for weight loss. Am Fam Physician 2016;94:161-6.  Back to cited text no. 16
    


    Figures

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  [Table 1]


This article has been cited by
1 Monotherapy with liraglutide Points to be focussed
Pugazhenthan Thangaraju,Sajitha Venkatesan
Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. 2019; 8(7): 2551
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

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