World Rural Health Conference
Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
Users Online: 782
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1884-1888

Coverage survey of Measles-Rubella mass vaccination campaign in a rural area in Tamil Nadu


Department of Community Medicine, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Ramachandra Institute of Higher Education and Research, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Aliya Jasmine
Department of Community Medicine, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Ramachandra Institute of Higher Education and Research, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_319_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: In Tamil Nadu, where health indicators are above the national average and routine immunization coverage is >95%, the tepid response to Measles-Rubella (MR) mass vaccination campaign was unexpected. Several parents refused MR vaccine for their children, due to false news claiming inefficiency and adverse effects due to the vaccine. Aim: This study was conducted to assess the Measles-Rubella (MR) mass vaccination coverage and to know the motivating factors and barriers for vaccination. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural area immediately following the mass vaccination campaign. Using a pre-tested structured questionnaire, data was collected on awareness of MR vaccination campaign, MR vaccination status, motivating factors and reasons for non-acceptance of the vaccine. Results: Vaccine coverage among the 616 children surveyed was 80.2%. Factors that motivated acceptance of vaccine among the immunized participants were easy access to immunization (85%), support and motivation from school teachers (41.1%) and community level health workers (25.5%). Barriers reported among the unimmunized participants were rumours of adverse effects (47.5%), fear of adverse effects (53.3%), and no faith in immunization (18.9%). Risk factors for vaccine refusal included female child (OR = 1.7, 95%CI = 1.1-2.6), Children not attending school (OR = 3.32, 95%CI = 2.1-5.1), Mothers with higher education (OR = 4.3, 95%CI = 1.2-15.2). Conclusion: An effective communication strategy addressing the needs and concerns of the public/parents should be in place and started early on before initiation of the mass vaccination programme.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed99    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded15    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal