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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 2502-2505

Sleep quality and insulin resistance in adolescent subjects with different circadian preference: A cross-sectional study


1 Department of Physiology, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Sitapur, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Physiology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Department of Respiratory Medicine, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
4 Department of Neurology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
5 Department of Center for Advance Research (Cytogenetics Unit), King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Anil Kumar Gangwar
Department of Physiology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow - 226 003, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_400_19

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Background: Studies have shown that alterations in the sleep cycle can predispose to several disorders. Most of the previous studies were done on the adults. Hence, the aim of the study was to see the effect of circadian disruption on the health of adolescent population. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 203 subjects were enrolled. Study subjects were divided into three groups: definite evening chronotype, intermediate chronotype, and definite morning chronotype. Sleep quality was measured by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Daytime sleepiness and chronotype were measured by Epworth Sleepiness Score and Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire Self-Assessment version, respectively. Two hours postprandial glucose was measured after oral glucose tolerance test. Fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin were measured. Homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. Data were summarized as mean ± standard deviation. Crude odds ratios and Karl Pearson's correlation coefficient of metabolic parameters with poor sleep were calculated. Results: Statistically significant difference was found in the mean value of poor sleep quality, 2 h postprandial blood glucose level, and insulin resistance among subjects of three groups. Subjects of evening chronotype have more significant positive correlation of 2 h postprandial blood glucose level and HOMA-IR value with poor sleep quality when compared with subjects of intermediate and morning chronotypes. Conclusion: Subjects with evening chronotype are more prone for development of metabolic syndrome compared with subjects of intermediate and morning chronotypes if proper health policies are not adopted for adolescents.


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