World Rural Health Conference
Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
Users Online: 4875
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 2699-2702

Effect of using tobacco on taste perception


Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, School of Dental Sciences, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences “Deemed to be University”, Malakapur, Karad, Satara, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Yugandhara S Kale
Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, School of Dental Sciences, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences “Deemed to be University,” Malakapur, Karad, Satara - 415 539, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_457_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Impaired taste perception has impact on quality of life. Tobacco is a perilous factor that contributes to an impaired taste. Objective: To evaluate and compare taste perception among tobacco chewers and nonchewers. Materials and Methods: Sixty subjects (30 tobacco chewers + 30 nonchewers as controls) were enrolled in the study for evaluating taste perception. Taste identification time using four aqueous solutions of basic tastes – sweet, salty, sour, and bitter – was recorded (in seconds) and compared between tobacco chewers and controls. The data were analyzed using Student's t-test and analysis of variance using SPSS 20 version software. Results: A statistically significant increase in taste identification time for salty taste in tobacco chewers (12.32 s) was noted compared with nonchewers (10.21 s) (P = 0.03). The average taste identification time was higher for tobacco chewers than nonchewers for sweet and salty taste. However, the average taste identification time was lower for tobacco chewers than nonchewers for sour and bitter taste. In nonchewers, the average taste identification time was 13.01, 10.21, 8.43, and 7.56 s for sweet, salty, bitter, and sour taste, respectively. In tobacco chewers, the average taste identification time was 15.16, 12.32, 7.75, and 7.04 s for sweet, salty, bitter, and sour taste, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the study demonstrated noticeable decrease in taste perception to salty taste among tobacco chewers when compared with tobacco nonchewers. There is a remarkable difference in taste perception to basic tastes among tobacco chewers and controls.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed95    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded27    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal