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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 3450-3457

Behavioral risk factors for hypertension among adults living with HIV accessing care in secondary health facilities in Lagos State, Nigeria


1 Department of Community Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos State; Department of Community Health and Primary Care, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba, Lagos State, Nigeria
2 Lagos State Health Service Commission, Lagos, Nigeria
3 Department of Community Medicine and Primary Care, Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Ogun State, Nigeria
4 Department of Community Health and Primary Care, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba, Lagos State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Oluwakemi Odukoya
Department of Community Health and Primary Care, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba, Lagos State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_544_20

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Background: Excess risk for cardiovascular disease, especially hypertension, may exist among human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV)-positive persons. This study was carried out to assess the prevalence of the behavioral risk factors for hypertension, including their awareness of these factors and their attitudes toward them. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 400 HIV-infected adults who accessed care in nine secondary health facilities in Lagos State, Nigeria. Respondents were selected by multistage sampling and data elicited using a structured, interviewer-administered questionnaire. Blood pressure (BP) was measured thrice and a respondent was considered as having raised BP if the mean of the last two measurements is ≥140 mm Hg (systolic BP) or ≥90 mm Hg (diastolic BP) or if respondents are currently taking anti-hypertensive. Results: Prevalence of key behavioral risk factors for hypertension was high. For instance, 82.0% of the respondents were physically inactive. Stress and physical inactivity were the two most known risks of hypertension, identified by 87.3% and 70.5% of the respondents, respectively. Majority (66.0%) had positive attitudes toward hypertension risk factors and 26.7% of them had raised BP. Lower age, that is, 30 years and below (OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.26–6.64), BMI of less than 25 (OR = 1.87, 95 CI = 1.16–3.01), and being diagnosed of HIV for 5 years and less (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.006–2.62) were significantly associated with normal BP measurements among respondents. Conclusion: The proportion of people living with HIV/AIDS who show known behaviors that place them at risk for hypertension is high. Measures to address these risk factors among them are warranted.


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