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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 4039-4044

Depression impedes neuroplasticity and quality of life after stroke


1 Department of Neurology, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Biochemistry, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Vandana Tiwari
Women Scientist (DST) and PhD, Department of Biochemistry, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_273_20

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Background and Purpose: Depression following a stroke/poststroke depression (PSD) has been newly recognized as one of the most common complications after stroke. PSD may affect neuroplasticity and quality of life. The purpose of present study was to find out effects of depression on functional recovery, quality of life and neuroplasticity in patients with acute stroke. Methods: A total of 76 cases were recruited for the study and out of which 44 were available for the analysis after six months. Patients were divided into three groups according to severity of depression: Group A (without depression), Group B (mild-to-moderate depression), and Group C (severe depression) on the basis of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scale scores. All patients were assessed for depression by PHQ-9, and for quality of life by Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) scale. Neuroplasticity was assessed by measuring levels of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Results: Quality of life was observed to be significantly affected by depression (P ≤ 0.05). The most commonly affected characteristics were energy, family roles, mobility, self-care, social roles, upper extremity function, and work productivity. Serum BDNF levels were also affected significantly by depression (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: PSD is a serious complication, affecting quality of life and neuroplasticity (BDNF) in patients. Decreased neuroplasticity further may affect functional improvement.


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