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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 4181-4189

Awareness, experience, and practice of physicians regarding adult gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia


1 Clinical Science Department, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, KSA; Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt
2 Clinical Science Department, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, KSA

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Rania Naguib
Clinical Science Department, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_585_20

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Background and Aims: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was frequently managed by residents as they are the first physician who encounter the patient. This study was conducted to explore the knowledge and practice of physicians in the treatment of GERD and to compare between residents and consultants regarding their knowledge and practice. Methodology: A cross-sectional study, self-administered questionnaire. Results: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was the most commonly used method to screen for Barrett's esophagus for symptoms for 5 or more years. The most frequent guideline used was the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) guideline. The most commonly used diagnostic tool for evaluating uncomplicated reflux disease was upper endoscopy with biopsy. Empiric trial with acid suppression was the most commonly used and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) was the first-line treatment. The most common combination with PPI was prokinetic drugs, most often domperidone. The preferred maintenance strategy was the 'on demand' maintenance mode. Step-down strategy was commonly recommended. A total of 26% of residents and 37% of consultants could achieve a score of good knowledge. Overall patterns of knowledge and practice of GERD diagnosis and management were comparable between residents and consultants with only minor controversy in their knowledge and practice. Conclusion: The overall patterns of knowledge and practice of GERD diagnosis and management are comparable among residents and consultants but still there are areas of controversy and confusion. A good knowledge score was found among only a quarter of residents and 37% of consultants. Recommendations: The public health implications of deviations from evidence-based practice should be studied and implementing evidence-based practice should be emphasized.


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