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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 4216-4222

A study on diabetic foot ulcers in Central rural India to formulate empiric antimicrobial therapy


1 Department of Surgery, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University) Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Radiodiagnosis, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University) Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Microbiology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University) Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amit Kumar Singh
Department of Surgery, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University) Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha - 442 107, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_700_20

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Aim: This study was carried out on patients with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) to assess the clinical characteristics, spectrum of microbial flora, antibiotic sensitivity, and devise an empiric antimicrobial therapy. Material Methods: Clinical data and tissue samples were collected from 105 diabetic foot ulcer patients between December 2018 and November 2019. The collected samples were processed as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and clinical and microbiological data was analyzed. Results: In this study of 105 patients, DFU was most common in males in 5th and 6th decade of life. Majority of patients had poor glycemic control and neuropathy. Of 110 bacterial isolates obtained from 97 samples, 73.7% were Gram-negative bacteria, and 27.3% were Gram-positive. Most of samples (48.6%) showed growth of single bacteria, growth of two bacteria and polymicrobial growth was seen in 28.6% and 15.2% of tissue samples respectively of which. Pseudomonas was predominant isolate (27.3%) sensitive to imipenem (90%), amikacin (86.6%), gentamicin (83.3%), and cefotaxime (80%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (19.1%) sensitive to amikacin and gentamicin (100%), and ofloxacin (90%). Pseudomonas, E. coli, Proteus and Klebsiella were highly resistant to ampicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. Conclusion: This study showed DFU are common in 5th and 6th decades of life. Gram-negative bacteria are predominant infective organism. Most of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria are resistant to variable degrees to commonly used antibiotics and sensitive to aminoglycosides. Amikacin and gentamicin can be used as empiric antibiotics for treatment of DFU infections.


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