Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 44--46

Seroprevalance of rubella in women with bad obstetric history


BV Ramana1, B Kailasanatha Reddy2, DS Murty2, KH Vasudevanaidu2 
1 Department of Microbiology, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati, India
2 Department of Microbiology, Sri Venkateswara Medical College, Tirupati, India

Correspondence Address:
B V Ramana
Department of Microbiology, Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati - 517 507, Andhra Pradesh
India

Rubella is a common cause of rash and fever during childhood. However, its public health importance relates to the teratogenic effects of primary rubella infection occurring in pregnant women, which can lead to fetal death with spontaneous abortion or to congenital defects in surviving infants. Most of the cases are asymptomatic and difficult to diagnose on clinical grounds. Detection of specific IgM antibodies by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique is a useful method for diagnosis.The present study was conducted on 180 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics at Government Maternity Hospital, Tirupati. All the serum samples were tested for Rubella-specific IgM antibodies. A seropositivity of 12.67% was observed among cases with bad obstetric history and 6.67% in normal pregnant women. Within the test group, high sero-positivity (13.33%) was observed in women with repeated abortions followed by in cases of intrauterine death (12.73%). The results indicate high prevalence of rubella in our population. All antenatal cases should be routinely screened for rubella, so that early diagnosis will help in proper management and fetal outcome.


How to cite this article:
Ramana B V, Reddy B K, Murty D S, Vasudevanaidu K H. Seroprevalance of rubella in women with bad obstetric history.J Family Med Prim Care 2013;2:44-46


How to cite this URL:
Ramana B V, Reddy B K, Murty D S, Vasudevanaidu K H. Seroprevalance of rubella in women with bad obstetric history. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Sep 19 ];2:44-46
Available from: http://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2013;volume=2;issue=1;spage=44;epage=46;aulast=Ramana;type=0