Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 281--285

Lifestyle-associated risk for cardiovascular diseases among doctors and nurses working in a medical college hospital in Tamil Nadu, India


Shailendra Kumar B Hegde1, G Vijayakrishnan1, Akshaya K Sasankh1, Sanjana Venkateswaran1, Ganeshkumar Parasuraman2 
1 Department of Community Medicine, SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, SRM University, Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Division of Epidemiology, National Institute of Epidemiology (ICMR), Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
G Vijayakrishnan
Department of Community Medicine, SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, SRM University, Potheri, Kattankulathur, Kanchipuram - 603 203, Tamil Nadu
India

Context: Globally, about 17 million people die of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) every year and a substantial number of these deaths are attributed to four major risk factors namely unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco consumption, and alcohol consumption. Doctors and nurses often have a sedentary lifestyle. Aims: This study aimed at assessing the lifestyle-associated risk for CVDs among doctors and nurses in a medical college hospital. Setting and Design: Cross-sectional study among 250 doctors and nurses, selected using a stratified random sampling, working at a medical college hospital in Tamil Nadu. Subjects and Methods: After consenting, each participant answered a questionnaire comprising questions pertaining to the sociodemographic characteristics as well as lifestyle-related risk factors. Risk was categorized into low, moderate, and high based on general risk factors, physical activity risk factors, and dietary risk factors separately. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics and Chi-square analysis were used to analyze the data. Results: It was found that 31.2% of all study subjects and 49.2% of doctors were at high general risk for CVDs; 30.4% of all study subjects and 42.1% of doctors were at high physical activity-related risk for CVDs; 14.4% of all study subjects and 19.8% of all doctors were at high dietary pattern-related risk for CVDs. Advancing age is a statistically significant risk factor across all risk groups. Conclusions: Doctors are at a higher risk for CVDs as compared to nurses as well as the general population.


How to cite this article:
Hegde SB, Vijayakrishnan G, Sasankh AK, Venkateswaran S, Parasuraman G. Lifestyle-associated risk for cardiovascular diseases among doctors and nurses working in a medical college hospital in Tamil Nadu, India.J Family Med Prim Care 2016;5:281-285


How to cite this URL:
Hegde SB, Vijayakrishnan G, Sasankh AK, Venkateswaran S, Parasuraman G. Lifestyle-associated risk for cardiovascular diseases among doctors and nurses working in a medical college hospital in Tamil Nadu, India. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2016 [cited 2020 Jul 2 ];5:281-285
Available from: http://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2016;volume=5;issue=2;spage=281;epage=285;aulast=Hegde;type=0