Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 581--586

Is small town India falling into the nutritional trap of metro cities? A study in school-going adolescents


Tabassum Nawab, Zulfia Khan, Iqbal Mohammed Khan, Mohammed Athar Ansari 
 Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Tabassum Nawab
Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh
India

Introduction: There has been an increasing secular trend in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in developing countries. The prevalence reported among children and adolescents of some metro cities in India are comparable to that in some developed countries. Westernization of culture, rapid mushrooming of fast food joints, lack of physical activity, and increasing sedentary pursuits in the metro cities are some of the reasons implicated for this. The nutritional changes in small town school children might be following the same pattern of larger cities. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of overweight and obesity among school-going adolescents of Aligarh and to study the sociodemographic and behavioral correlates of the same. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study done in two affluent and two nonaffluent schools in Aligarh, taking 330 adolescents from each group (total-660). Study tools included a predesigned and pretested questionnaire, Global Physical Activity Questionnaire, and anthropometric measurement. Overweight and obesity were defined based on World Health Organization 2007 Growth Reference. Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis were done. Results: Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 9.8% and 4.8% among school-going adolescents. The difference in prevalence of overweight and obesity among affluent schools (14.8% and 8.2%) and nonaffluent schools (4.8% and 1.5%) was significant. Risk factors for overweight and obesity were affluence, higher maternal education, parental history of obesity, frequent fast food intake, and television (TV) viewing more than 2 h/day. Conclusion: Overweight and obesity among school-going adolescents is a crisis facing even smaller cities in India. Behavior change communication should be focused to adolescents, especially of the affluent section, toward restricting fast food intake, and TV viewing.


How to cite this article:
Nawab T, Khan Z, Khan IM, Ansari MA. Is small town India falling into the nutritional trap of metro cities? A study in school-going adolescents.J Family Med Prim Care 2016;5:581-586


How to cite this URL:
Nawab T, Khan Z, Khan IM, Ansari MA. Is small town India falling into the nutritional trap of metro cities? A study in school-going adolescents. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Sep 17 ];5:581-586
Available from: http://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2016;volume=5;issue=3;spage=581;epage=586;aulast=Nawab;type=0