Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

EVIDENCE BASED SUMMARY
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 7--13

Minimum data set (MDS) based trauma registry, is the data adequate? An evidence-based study from Odisha, India


Sanghamitra Pati1, Rinshu Dwivedi1, Ramesh Athe1, Pramod Kumar Dey2, Subhashisa Swain3 
1 Health Technology Assessment (HTAIn), ICMR-Regional Medical Research Centre, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Department of Health and Family Welfare, Government of Odisha, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
3 Indian Institute of Public Health (IIPH), Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Rinshu Dwivedi
ICMR-Regional Medical Research Centre, Department of Health Research, Bhubaneswar, Odisha - 751 023
India

Background: In majority of the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), the societal cost of injuries are alarming. The severity and magnitude of the road traffic injuries (RTI) in India are not estimated accurately due to the lack of availability of data. The data are limited on the aspects such as demographics, cause, severity of injury, processes of care, and the final outcome of injuries. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of setting up a sustainable trauma registry in Odisha, India, and to determine the demographics, mechanism, severity, and outcomes of injury reported to the facilities/hospital. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted at Srirama Chandra Bhanja Medical College and Hospital (SCB-MCH), Cuttack, India. Injured patients who reported/admitted to the emergency department were observed, and data were collected by using a minimum data set (MDS) developed by the World Health Organization (WHO). Data were collected for a period of one month in June 2015. Observations were collected on 20 variables. The completeness of data collection ranged from 60% (19 variables) to 70% (23 variables) out of total 33 variables. Results: This study uses 145 cases of injury reported in SCB-MCH. Out of the total reported population at the trauma registry, about 21% were females. Nearly 45% of the injury occurred on road/street. RTI accounted for 36.6% of injury. Out of the total admitted cases, 2.8% died in the emergency department, 11% were discharged to home, and 7.6% left against medical advice. Majority of the respondents have reported single injuries (77%). Head injuries were more common and severe among majority of the reported cases (44.1%), followed by neck injury (28.3%) and chest (15.9%). Conclusions: This study indicates the challenges in obtaining complete data on injury. Data were missing in terms of admission, discharge, and Glasgow Comma Scale (GCS) among the studied population. This study suggests that individual GCS scoring should be done instead of total GCS scoring in each trauma patient. By collection and storage of adequate data, better policy decisions can be implemented, which will minimize and prevent trauma cases and maximize the utilization of the available resources.


How to cite this article:
Pati S, Dwivedi R, Athe R, Dey PK, Swain S. Minimum data set (MDS) based trauma registry, is the data adequate? An evidence-based study from Odisha, India.J Family Med Prim Care 2019;8:7-13


How to cite this URL:
Pati S, Dwivedi R, Athe R, Dey PK, Swain S. Minimum data set (MDS) based trauma registry, is the data adequate? An evidence-based study from Odisha, India. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Jul 19 ];8:7-13
Available from: http://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2019;volume=8;issue=1;spage=7;epage=13;aulast=Pati;type=0