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FAMILY PRACTICE
Childhood obesity: causes and consequences
Krushnapriya Sahoo, Bishnupriya Sahoo, Ashok Kumar Choudhury, Nighat Yasin Sofi, Raman Kumar, Ajeet Singh Bhadoria
April-June 2015, 4(2):187-192
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.154628  PMID:25949965
Childhood obesity has reached epidemic levels in developed as well as in developing countries. Overweight and obesity in childhood are known to have significant impact on both physical and psychological health. Overweight and obese children are likely to stay obese into adulthood and more likely to develop non-communicable diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age. The mechanism of obesity development is not fully understood and it is believed to be a disorder with multiple causes. Environmental factors, lifestyle preferences, and cultural environment play pivotal roles in the rising prevalence of obesity worldwide. In general, overweight and obesity are assumed to be the results of an increase in caloric and fat intake. On the other hand, there are supporting evidence that excessive sugar intake by soft drink, increased portion size, and steady decline in physical activity have been playing major roles in the rising rates of obesity all around the world. Childhood obesity can profoundly affect children's physical health, social, and emotional well-being, and self esteem. It is also associated with poor academic performance and a lower quality of life experienced by the child. Many co-morbid conditions like metabolic, cardiovascular, orthopedic, neurological, hepatic, pulmonary, and renal disorders are also seen in association with childhood obesity.
  292 45,680 6,534
RESEARCH AND AUDIT
Validity, reliability, and generalizability in qualitative research
Lawrence Leung
July-September 2015, 4(3):324-327
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.161306  PMID:26288766
In general practice, qualitative research contributes as significantly as quantitative research, in particular regarding psycho-social aspects of patient-care, health services provision, policy setting, and health administrations. In contrast to quantitative research, qualitative research as a whole has been constantly critiqued, if not disparaged, by the lack of consensus for assessing its quality and robustness. This article illustrates with five published studies how qualitative research can impact and reshape the discipline of primary care, spiraling out from clinic-based health screening to community-based disease monitoring, evaluation of out-of-hours triage services to provincial psychiatric care pathways model and finally, national legislation of core measures for children's healthcare insurance. Fundamental concepts of validity, reliability, and generalizability as applicable to qualitative research are then addressed with an update on the current views and controversies.
  138 25,209 5,316
REVIEW ARTICLES
Systematic reviews and meta-analysis: Understanding the best evidence in primary healthcare
S Gopalakrishnan, P Ganeshkumar
January-March 2013, 2(1):9-14
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.109934  PMID:24479036
Healthcare decisions for individual patients and for public health policies should be informed by the best available research evidence. The practice of evidence-based medicine is the integration of individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research and patient's values and expectations. Primary care physicians need evidence for both clinical practice and for public health decision making. The evidence comes from good reviews which is a state-of-the-art synthesis of current evidence on a given research question. Given the explosion of medical literature, and the fact that time is always scarce, review articles play a vital role in decision making in evidence-based medical practice. Given that most clinicians and public health professionals do not have the time to track down all the original articles, critically read them, and obtain the evidence they need for their questions, systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines may be their best source of evidence. Systematic reviews aim to identify, evaluate, and summarize the findings of all relevant individual studies over a health-related issue, thereby making the available evidence more accessible to decision makers. The objective of this article is to introduce the primary care physicians about the concept of systematic reviews and meta-analysis, outlining why they are important, describing their methods and terminologies used, and thereby helping them with the skills to recognize and understand a reliable review which will be helpful for their day-to-day clinical practice and research activities.
  90 11,194 2,475
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medication use as the precipitating factor in readmissions to the hospital
Vishal Sehgal, Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa, Rinku Sehgal, Anurag Bajaj, Upinder Khaira, Victoria Kresse
April-June 2013, 2(2):194-199
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.117423  PMID:24479078
Background and Aim: Readmission to the hospital within 30 days of discharge from the hospital is a common occurrence. Congestive heart failure is the most common cause of readmissions in the hospital. We hypothesized that irrespective of the admission diagnosis polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate use of medications (PIM) leads to readmissions within 30 days of discharge from the hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the hospital records of 414 patients who were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of discharge from the hospital between January 2008 and December 2009. The data was stratified to see which patients were on polypharmacy and/or on PIM. Polypharmacy was defined as use of more than 5 medications. PIM was defined as per the modified Beers criteria. Day 0 was defined as the day of discharge and day1 was defined as the day-after Admission to the hospital. Statistical analysis was carried out using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on the data to see if polypharmacy and/or PIM was related to readmission within 30 days of discharge irrespective of admission diagnosis. Results: Polypharmacy was related to hospital readmission at day 1 and day 0, however inappropriate drug use was found to be not related at any day. Polypharmacy and PIM combined had a positive correlation to readmission only on days 1 and 0 and it was statistically significant. The use of minimal and appropriate use of drugs was statistically significant compared to polypharmacy and PIM use. Conclusions: Polypharmacy and PIM are under recognized cause of readmissions to the hospital.
  39 5,896 857
REVIEW ARTICLE
A Public Health Perspective of Road Traffic Accidents
S Gopalakrishnan
July-December 2012, 1(2):144-150
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.104987  PMID:24479025
Road traffic accidents (RTAs) have emerged as an important public health issue which needs to be tackled by a multi-disciplinary approach. The trend in RTA injuries and death is becoming alarming in countries like India. The number of fatal and disabling road accident happening is increasing day by day and is a real public health challenge for all the concerned agencies to prevent it. The approach to implement the rules and regulations available to prevent road accidents is often ineffective and half-hearted. Awareness creation, strict implementation of traffic rules, and scientific engineering measures are the need of the hour to prevent this public health catastrophe. This article is intended to create awareness among the health professionals about the various modalities available to prevent road accidents and also to inculcate a sense of responsibility toward spreading the message of road safety as a good citizen of our country.
  38 8,350 1,269
REVIEW ARTICLES
An epidemiological overview of child sexual abuse
Mannat Mohanjeet Singh, Shradha S Parsekar, Sreekumaran N Nair
October-December 2014, 3(4):430-435
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.148139  PMID:25657958
Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a universal problem with grave life-long outcomes. The estimates vary widely depending on the country under study, the definitions used, the type of CSA studied, the extent of coverage, and quality of data. This study intended to assess the magnitude and the issues related to CSA. We searched databases such as PubMed, Google scholar, web (newspaper reports), and government websites. The relevant data was extracted from these sources for gathering evidence on CSA and secondary data analysis was done. The prevalence of CSA was found to be high in India as well as throughout the world. CSA is an extensive problem and even the lowest prevalence includes a huge number of victims. It also has various adverse effects on the psychological, physical, behavioral, and interpersonal well-being of the victim. Hence, stringent measures should be taken for the prevention and control of this hidden public health issue.
  35 4,634 729
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Prevalence of chronic insomnia in adult patients and its correlation with medical comorbidities
Swapna Bhaskar, D Hemavathy, Shankar Prasad
October-December 2016, 5(4):780-784
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.201153  PMID:28348990
Introduction: Insomnia is one of the common but neglected conditions seen in family practice with long term and serious effects on health of a patient. Family physicians have the responsibility of diagnosing and adequately treating this. This study was done to find the prevalence of chronic insomnia in adult patients visiting a family medicine outpatient department (OPD) in a hospital and to assess the risk factors and co morbidities associated with it. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was done in the family medicine OPD at St. Philomena's Hospital, Bengaluru. All adult patients attending the OPD from September 1 to October 30, 2015 were enrolled in the study after obtaining written consent. Athens Insomnia Scale was used to diagnose insomnia and information regarding medical co morbidities was collected. Data was analyzed for the prevalence of insomnia and its association with co morbidities. Results: Chronic insomnia was seen in 33% of the adult population sampled. Increasing age and diabetes were significantly associated with insomnia, while other socioeconomic factors and co morbidities were not significantly associated. Twenty-seven percent of patients who had insomnia did not perceive the condition, which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Insomnia is a common sleep disorder which is many times missed by a primary care physician until/unless asked for. Since there is a higher incidence with increasing age and co morbidities such as diabetes, all patients, especially middle-aged and diabetics, should be screened for insomnia by the primary care physician with a self assessed questionnaire and counseled.
  32 4,572 575
Reliability of dipstick assay in predicting urinary tract infection
Anith Kumar Mambatta, Jayalakshmi Jayarajan, Vinitha L Rashme, Sanchitha Harini, Sujaya Menon, Jayachandran Kuppusamy
April-June 2015, 4(2):265-268
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.154672  PMID:25949979
Aims: Urine dipstick analysis is a quick, cheap and a useful test in predicting Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in hospitalized patients. Our aim is to evaluate the reliability (sensitivity) of urine dipstick analysis against urine culture in the diagnosis of UTI. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to our hospital suspected of having UTI, with positive urine cultures were included in this study from a 2-year period (January 2011 to December 2012). Dipstick urinalysis was done using multistix 10 SG (Siemens) and clinitek advantus analyzer. The sensitivity of dipstick nitrites, leukocyte esterase and blood in these culture-positive UTI patients was calculated retrospectively. Results: Urine dipstick analysis of 635 urine culture-positive patients was studied. The sensitivity of nitrite alone and leukocyte esterase alone were 23.31% and 48.5%, respectively. The sensitivity of blood alone in positive urine culture was 63.94%, which was the highest sensitivity for a single screening test. The presence of leukocyte esterase and/or blood increased the sensitivity to 72.28%. The sensitivity was found to be the highest when nitrite, leukocyte and blood were considered together. Conclusions: Nitrite test and leukocyte esterase test when used individually is not reliable to rule out UTI. Hence, symptomatic UTI patients with negative dipstick assay should be subjected to urine culture for a proper management.
  24 6,209 789
Knowledge, attitude and practices on malaria among the rural communities in Aliero, Northern Nigeria
Rupashree Singh, Jamila Musa, Sanjay Singh, Ukatu Victoria Ebere
January-March 2014, 3(1):39-44
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.130271  PMID:24791235
Objective: Families' perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes about malaria causation, symptom identification, treatment of malaria, and prevention are often overlooked in malaria control efforts. This study was conducted to understand these issues, which can be an important step towards developing strategies, aimed at controlling malaria. Materials and Methods: A community based descriptive cross-sectional study in four villages: Danwarai, Gehuru, Jiga, and Kashin Zama of Aliero local government area in Kebbi Sate, in northern Nigeria. Two hundred household were randomly selected and interviewed using standardized questionnaire. Results: Knowledge of the role of mosquitoes in malaria transmission (11.8%) and cause of malaria (9.6%) was observed to be low among the study population. Comprehensive knowledge about malaria prevention measures was high (90%), but not reflecting in their practice (16%). They have good knowledge of mosquito behavior (breeding areas (64.5%), resting places (70%) and biting time (81%)). Seeking hospital care for a febrile child was a good practice (68.5%) observed. Attitudes regarding the "best antimalarial therapy" was limited (56.7%) to chloroquine. Conclusions: Misconceptions about malaria transmission and its cause still exist. Knowledge about preventive measures does not necessarily translate into improvement in practices. There is a need for targeted educational programs to increase the communities' efforts to develop desirable attitude and practices regarding malaria and their participation for malaria control.
  23 4,820 722
REVIEW ARTICLE
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease: What is important for primary care physicians?
Mohamed H Ahmed, Nazik Elmalaika OS Husain, Ahmed O Almobarak
January-March 2015, 4(1):45-52
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.152252  PMID:25810989
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is emerging as the most common chronic liver condition in Western World and across the globe. NAFLD prevalence is estimated to be around one-third of the total population. There are no published data that project the future prevalence of NAFLD, but with an increase in epidemic of diabetes and obesity, it is possible to suggest an increase in a number of individuals with NAFLD. NAFLD is associated with insulin resistance and occurs with an increase in cluster of features of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, it is important to exclude the possibility of diabetes in those individuals with evidence of fatty liver. The global diabetes epidemic continues to grow, and it is estimated that the number of people with diabetes will double by year 2030. NAFLD is also a risk factor for an increase in cardiovascular incidence independent of age, sex, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, smoking, and cluster of metabolic syndromes. It is expected that NAFLD will be an important challenge for health providers in the near future. Taking all these factors into consideration, we believe that increasing awareness of metabolic and cardiovascular impact of NAFLD among general practitioners and health authorities may decrease the serious consequences of late diagnosis of NAFLD. Importantly, the collaboration between medical specialties is vital in decreasing the impact of the epidemic of NAFLD. The focus of this review is in the role of primary care physician in diagnosis, treatment and prevention of NAFLD and patients education.
  21 3,709 516
REVIEW ARTICLES
Impact of antiepileptic drugs on bone health: Need for monitoring, treatment, and prevention strategies
Ekta Arora, Harmanjit Singh, Yogendra Kumar Gupta
April-June 2016, 5(2):248-253
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.192338  PMID:27843822
Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide. In India, overall prevalence of epilepsy is reported to be 5.59/1000 population. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) constitute the main-stay of treatment with a large number of AEDs available in the market. High incidence of adverse effects is a major limitation with AEDs. One of the major concerns is significant metabolic effects on the bone. However, little attention has been paid to this issue because most of the bone effects remain subclinical for a long time and may take years to manifest clinically. The main effects include hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, reduced serum levels of Vitamin D, increase in parathormone (PTH) levels, and alterations in bone turnover markers. The CYP450 enzyme-inducing AEDs such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and primidone are the most common AEDs associated with bone disorders while the data regarding the effect of valproate and newer AEDs such as lamotrigine, gabapentin, vigabatrin, levetiracetam, and topiramate on bone metabolism and bone density are scanty and controversial. Deficiency of Vitamin D is commonly described as a cause for the bone loss in epileptic patients while others being decreased absorption of calcium, increased PTH levels, and inhibition of calcitonin secretion, etc. However, there are no formal practical guidelines for the management of bone disease among those taking AEDs. Evidence-based strategies regarding monitoring, prevention, and treatment of bone diseases in patients on AED therapy are needed.
  21 3,560 680
COMMENTARIES
Primary care in dentistry - An untapped potential
Ramandeep Singh Gambhir
January-March 2015, 4(1):13-18
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.152239  PMID:25810982
Dentistry is neither an allied health profession nor a paramedical profession. It is the only anatomically focused health care profession that is university-based and for which primary care responsibility is maintained by the profession. Dentists must have a reliable knowledge of basic clinical medicine for safely and effectively treating individuals with chronic and other diseases, which make them biologically and pharmacologically compromised. With changes in the life expectancy of people and lifestyles, as well as rapid advancement in biomedical sciences, dentists should have similar knowledge like a physician in any other fields of medicine. There are number of primary care activities that can be conducted in the dental office like screening of diabetics, managing hypertension etc., The present review was conducted after doing extensive literature search of peer-reviewed journals. The review throws a spotlight on these activities and also suggests some the measures that can be adopted to modify dental education to turn dentists to oral physicians.
  16 3,390 477
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
The prevalence and burden of psychiatric disorders in primary health care visits in Qatar: Too little time?
Abdulbari Bener, Mohammed T Abou-Saleh, Elnour E Dafeeah, Dinesh Bhugra
January-March 2015, 4(1):89-95
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.152262  PMID:25810996
Background: Psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression, somatization, obsessive compulsive, and bipolar disorders are recognized as causing the biggest burden of disease worldwide. Aim: In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence and burden of common mental disorders at Primary Health Care Centers (PHCC) using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI) in the Qatari population, aged 18-65 who attended Primary Health Care (PHC) settings. Design: A prospective cross-sectional study conducted during November 2011 to October 2012. Setting: Primary Health Care Centers of the Supreme Council of Health, Qatar. Subjects: A total of 2,000 Qatari subjects aged 18-65 years were approached; 1475 (73.3%) agreed to participate. Methods: Prevalence and severity of International Classification of Disease-10 disorders were assessed with the WHO-CIDI (Version 3.0). Results: Of the 1475 participants, 830 (56.3%) were females and 645 (43.7%) was males. One-third were aged 35-49 years 558 (37.8%). The three most common disorders were major depression disorders (18.31%), any anxiety disorders (17.3%), any mood disorders (16.95%), followed by separation anxiety disorders (15.25%), personality disorder (14.1%). In the present study, prevalence in women was significantly higher than men for the most common psychiatric disorders, specifically generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, specific phobias, obsessive compulsive disorders, posttraumatic disorder, somatization, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, dysthymia, and oppositional defiant disorder. Of the total 20% had only one psychiatric diagnosis and 12% had two disorders, 9.7% respondents with three diagnoses, and finally 4.3% of respondents had four or more diagnoses. Conclusion: One-fifth of all adults who attended the PHCC (20%) had at least one psychiatric diagnosis. The CIDI is a useful instrument for psychiatric diagnosis in community settings such as PHC clinics, clinical research and intervention studies. There is an urgent need to not only assess prevalence, but also risk factors, burden, treatment gaps and outcomes to obtain evidence for policy making.
  15 3,695 364
Drug-induced hepatitis and the risk factors for liver injury in pulmonary tuberculosis patients
Gajanan S Gaude, Alisha Chaudhury, Jyothi Hattiholi
April-June 2015, 4(2):238-243
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.154661  PMID:25949974
Introduction: Short-course chemotherapy containing rifampicin and isoniazid in combination has proved to be highly effective in the treatment of tuberculosis, but one of its adverse effects is hepatotoxicity. Various risk factors have been found to be associated with drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in general population. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of drug-induced hepatitis and the risk factors associated with the DILI among the patients of pulmonary tuberculosis in Indian patients. Setting and Design: Prospective nested case control study. Materials and Methods: Out of the cohort of 3900 tuberculosis patients who were initiated on anti-tubercular therapy, 150 patients who developed drug-induced liver injury due to short-course chemotherapy under RNTCP were included in the analysis. Thirty cases were being followed up in our hospital and other 120 were referred to us for the management of drug-induced hepatitis from the primary health centers. The diagnostic criteria's for DILI were made according to the American Thoracic Society criteria. Analyses of various risk factors were done for the development of DILI. Results: The prevalence of DILI in the present study was 3.8%. It was observed that DILI patients were older and their serum albumin levels were lower, and they had multiple co-morbid conditions. Regular alcohol intake, more extensive disease associated with radiological and female gender were observed to be independent risk factors for the development of DILI. Conclusions: Of the various risk factors analyzed, advanced age, hypoalbuminemia, regular alcohol intake and advanced nature of the disease were independent risk factors for the development of DILI. The risk of development of hepatitis is increased in the presence of one or more of these risk factors.
  14 4,881 696
Menstrual characteristics and prevalence of dysmenorrhea in college going girls
MoolRaj Kural, Naziya Nagori Noor, Deepa Pandit, Tulika Joshi, Anjali Patil
July-September 2015, 4(3):426-431
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.161345  PMID:26288786
Background: Dysmenorrhea is a common gynecological condition with painful menstrual cramps of uterine origin. Prevalence of primary dysmenorrhea is not yet clearly studied in central India. Objective: To study prevalence of primary dysmenorrhea in young girls and to evaluate associated clinical markers of dysmenorrhea. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, data was collected among 310 girls (18-25 years) on age at menarche, presence and absence of dysmenorrhea, dysmenorrhea duration, pre-menstrual symptoms (PMS), family history, menses irregularities, menstrual history, severity grading using visual analogue scale (VAS) using a semi-structured questionnaire. Results: Dysmenorrhea was reported in 84.2% (261) girls and 15.8% (49) reported no dysmenorrhea. Using VAS, 34.2% of girls experienced severe pain, 36.6% moderate and 29.2% had mild pain. Bleeding duration was found to be significantly associated with dysmenorrhea (χ2 = 10.5; P < 0.05), girls with bleeding duration more than 5 days had 1.9 times more chance of getting dysmenorrhea (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.7-3). Moreover, girls with the presence of clots had 2.07 times higher chance of having dysmenorrhea (OR: 2.07; 95% CI: 1.04-4.1) (P < 0.05). Almost 53.7% girls who had some family history of dysmenorrhea, 90.9% experience the condition themselves (χ2 = 11.5; P < 0.001). Girls with family history of dysmenorrhea had three times greater chance of having the same problem (OR: 3.0; 95% CI: 1.5-5.8; P = 0.001). Conclusion: Dysmenorrhea is found to be highly prevalent among college going girls. Family history, bleeding duration and presence of clots were significant risk factors for dysmenorrhea.
  14 8,084 858
REVIEW ARTICLE
Disability and rehabilitation services in India: Issues and challenges
S Ganesh Kumar, Gautam Roy, Sitanshu Sekhar Kar
January-June 2012, 1(1):69-73
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.94458  PMID:24479007
Disability is an important public health problem especially in developing countries like India. The problem will increase in future because of increase in trend of non-communicable diseases and change in age structure with an increase in life expectancy. The issues are different in developed and developing countries, and rehabilitation measures should be targeted according the needs of the disabled with community participation. In India, a majority of the disabled resides in rural areas where accessibility, availability, and utilization of rehabilitation services and its cost-effectiveness are the major issues to be considered. Research on disability burden, appropriate intervention strategies and their implementation to the present context in India is a big challenge. Recent data was collected from Medline and various other sources and analyzed. The paper discusses various issues and challenges related to disability and rehabilitation services in India and emphasize to strengthen health care and service delivery to disabled in the community.
  14 17,919 1,949
REVIEW ARTICLES
Protein energy malnutrition in India: The plight of our under five children
Dechenla Tshering Bhutia
January-March 2014, 3(1):63-67
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.130279  PMID:24791240
Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is a major public health problem in India. This affects the child at the most crucial period of time of development, which can lead to permanent impairment in later life. PEM is measured in terms of underweight (low weight for age), stunting (low height for age) and wasting (low weight for height). The prevalence of stunting among under five is 48% and wasting is 19.8% and with an underweight prevalence of 42.5%, it is the highest in the world. Undernutrition predisposes the child to infection and complements its effect in contributing to child mortality. Lalonde model (1974) is used to look into the various determinants of PEM in under five children and its interrelation in causation of PEM. The determinants of PEM are broadly classified under four distinct categories: Environmental factors including the physical and social environment, behavioral factors, health-care service related and biological factors. The socio-cultural factors play an important role wherein, it affects the attitude of the care giver in feeding and care practices. Faulty feeding practice in addition to poor nutritional status of the mother further worsens the situation. The vicious cycle of poor nutritional status of the mother leading to low birth weight child further exposes the child to susceptibility to infections which aggravates the situation. However, it is seen that percapita income of the family did not have much bearing on the poor nutritional status of the child rather lack of proper health-care services adversely contributed to poor nutritional status of the child. PEM is a critical problem with many determinants playing a role in causing this vicious cycle of undernutrition. With almost half of under five children undernourished in India, the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of halving the prevalence of underweight by 2015 seems a distant dream.
  14 6,021 932
Urinary tract cancers: An overview for general practice
Julian P Yaxley
July-September 2016, 5(3):533-538
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.197258  PMID:28217578
Urinary tract cancers are common and comprise a gamut of lesions ranging from small benign tumors to aggressive neoplasms with high mortality. The predominant urinary tract malignancy is bladder cancer. The clinical challenge is early detection and adequate follow-up because recurrence is high and delayed diagnosis is associated with poor prognosis. Primary care physicians form a key part of the management apparatus for these patients and may be responsible for ensuring adequate ongoing surveillance. This article aims to outline the evaluation of patients in whom urinary tract cancer is suspected and briefly review the general principles of treatment.
  14 1,796 275
FAMILY PRACTICE
Consultation content not consultation length improves patient satisfaction
Thomas I Lemon, Rebecca H Smith
October-December 2014, 3(4):333-339
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.148102  PMID:25657939
The suggestion that increased consultation length leads to improved patient satisfaction has some evidence, albeit uncertain. Importantly there are other determinants within the doctor-patient consultation that themselves may be responsible for this improved satisfaction and it is these we investigate in this paper. A systematic review of PubMed and associated papers was carried out using search terms 'family practice consultation length', 'general practice consultation length', 'local health authority consultation length' and 'primary care consultation length'. 590 papers were originally selected using these search terms, post scoring this number became 9. The results obtained support the idea that consultation length does not directly improve consultation outcome, but rather there are variables integrated within the consultation affecting this. Increased time purely allows a physician to implement management, particularly relating to psychosocial aspects.
  13 2,052 373
Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: An overlooked cause of foot deformity
Preet Singh Bubra, Geffrey Singh Keighley, Shruti Rateesh, David Carmody
January-March 2015, 4(1):26-29
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.152245  PMID:25810985
Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of adult acquired flatfoot. Degenerative changes in this tendon, lead to pain and weakness and if not identified and treated will progress to deformity of the foot and degenerative changes in the surrounding joints. Patients will complain of medial foot pain, weakness, and a slowly progressive foot deformity. A "too many toes" sign may be present and patients will be unable to perform a single heal raise test. Investigations such X-ray, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging will help stage the disease and decide on management. The optimal manage may change based on the progression of deformity and stage of disease. Early identification and prompt initiation of treatment can halt progression of the disease. The purpose of this article is to examine the causes, signs, symptoms, examinations, investigations and treatment options for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.
  13 4,553 742
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Predictors of postpartum depression in the eastern province capital of Saudi Arabia
Lamia I Alasoom, Manal R Koura
April-June 2014, 3(2):146-150
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.137654  PMID:25161973
Background and Objectives: Postpartum depression (PPD) is a major depressive episode that occurs four weeks after delivery. Its risk increases during the first ninety days after delivery and continues for almost two years. The aim of present study is to assess the prevalence of PPD and the associated risk factors in the Eastern Province capital of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the five largest Primary Healthcare Centers of Dammam. Four hundred and fifty mothers - visiting the health centers for immunizing their children at age two to six months - were selected by proportionate allocation to the population served by each health center. The mothers were screened for PPD using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and interviewed for the associated risk factors. Results: It was found that 17.8% of the women had PPD. Regression analysis revealed that the strongest predictor of PPD was a family history of depression, followed by non-supportive husband, lifetime history of depression, unwanted pregnancy, and stressful life events. It was recommended to screen all high-risk mothers for PPD, while visiting the Primary Care Well-Baby Clinics.
  13 2,541 481
FAMILY PRACTICE
Fractures of distal radius: An overview
Sanjay Meena, Pankaj Sharma, Abhishek Kumar Sambharia, Ashok Dawar
October-December 2014, 3(4):325-332
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.148101  PMID:25657938
Fractures of distal radius account for up to 20% of all fractures treated in emergency department. Initial assessment includes a history of mechanism of injury, associated injury and appropriate radiological evaluation. Treatment options include conservative management, internal fixation with pins, bridging and non-bridging external fixation, dorsal or volar plating with/without arthroscopy assistance. However, many questions regarding these fractures remain unanswered and good prospective randomized trials are needed.
  12 8,603 1,088
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and assessments of their risk factors in urban slums of Bangalore
Hemavathi Dasappa, Farah Naaz Fathima, Rugmani Prabhakar, Sanjay Sarin
July-September 2015, 4(3):399-404
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.161336  PMID:26288781
Background: To determine the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and to assess the risk factors associated with diabetes and pre-diabetes in the urban slums of Bangalore. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in four slums of Bangalore in the age group of 35 years and above comprising of total 2013 subjects. Risk factors like age, sex, family history, behavior, physical activity, BMI, waist hip ration, diet habits were assessed to find their association with diabetes. Results: Prevalence of diabetes was 12.33% and of pre-diabetes was 11.57%. Prevalence was more among the females compared to males. Increasing age, over weight and obesity, sedentary life style, tobacco consumption, diet habits showed statistically significant association with prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes. Conclusion: Physical activity like regular exercises both at the office and at home, fibers-rich diet, blood sugar estimation after 35 years are some of the recommendations which can control diabetes.
  12 3,660 604
Determinants of utilization of antenatal care services in rural Lucknow, India
Manas P Roy, Uday Mohan, Shivendra K Singh, Vijay K Singh, Anand K Srivastava
January-March 2013, 2(1):55-59
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.109946  PMID:24479045
Background: Antenatal care services are the first steps towards ensuring the health of mothers and the newborn. This is the key component for achieving Millennium Development Goals by 2015. But India's performance continues to be poor in providing antenatal care services to its huge population, particularly in the rural areas. Objective: To assess the determinants of utilization of antenatal services by rural beneficiaries in Lucknow, a district of north India. Materials and Methods: The study, cross-sectional in design, was conducted from August 2009 to July 2010. Multistage random sampling was used for selecting villages. A total of 352 recently delivered women were selected following systematic random sampling. Logistic regression was used to find out the determinants of three antenatal care services. Results: Overall, 85.5% of the beneficiaries surveyed were found to receive at least three antenatal care services from any health facility. Community health centre was the most common source for such care. Significant difference was found between beneficiaries who took three antenatal care visits and who did not in terms of age, socio economic status, and timing of registration. On multiple regression, only age (OR = 2.107, 95% CI = 1.132 - 3.923) and timing of registration (OR = 2.817, 95% CI = 1.487 - 5.338) were found to be the predictors for three antenatal care visits. Conclusion: Intervention should be focused on young and late registered women for ensuring sufficient care during pregnancy.
  12 4,358 742
REVIEW ARTICLE
Vaccine epidemiology: A review
Chandrakant Lahariya
January-March 2016, 5(1):7-15
DOI:10.4103/2249-4863.184616  PMID:27453836
This review article outlines the key concepts in vaccine epidemiology, such as basic reproductive numbers, force of infection, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, vaccine failure, herd immunity, herd effect, epidemiological shift, disease modeling, and describes the application of this knowledge both at program levels and in the practice by family physicians, epidemiologists, and pediatricians. A case has been made for increased knowledge and understanding of vaccine epidemiology among key stakeholders including policy makers, immunization program managers, public health experts, pediatricians, family physicians, and other experts/individuals involved in immunization service delivery. It has been argued that knowledge of vaccine epidemiology which is likely to benefit the society through contributions to the informed decision-making and improving vaccination coverage in the low and middle income countries (LMICs). The article ends with suggestions for the provision of systematic training and learning platforms in vaccine epidemiology to save millions of preventable deaths and improve health outcomes through life-course.
  12 3,364 837
* Source: CrossRef
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