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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 2047  

Dental nurse role in operatory during and post pandemic outbreak of COVID-19


Data Manager, Department of Research and Development, Bristol Myers Squibb, New Jersey, USA

Date of Submission30-Oct-2020
Date of Decision02-Dec-2020
Date of Acceptance02-Dec-2020
Date of Web Publication31-May-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Rishitha Sajja
Data Manager, Department of Research and Development, Bristol Myers Squibb, New Jersey
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_2229_20

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How to cite this article:
Sajja R. Dental nurse role in operatory during and post pandemic outbreak of COVID-19. J Family Med Prim Care 2021;10:2047

How to cite this URL:
Sajja R. Dental nurse role in operatory during and post pandemic outbreak of COVID-19. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Jun 24];10:2047. Available from: https://www.jfmpc.com/text.asp?2021/10/5/2047/317292



Dear Editor

I read the article[1] published “Evaluating the effect of nurse-led telephone follow-ups (tele-nursing) on the anxiety levels in people with coronavirus” with great interest. The current COVID-19 pandemic has created a massive impact all around the world. Initially, the disease pathology was considered not significant due to the unavailability of information regarding modes of transmission and disease pathogenesis. The impact of the virus varies with the age and health status of the infected person.[2] Initially, the signs and symptoms were related to common flu, but owing to the increased mortality, the world health organization (WHO) and centers disease and prevention control (CDC) have proposed the fatality of the infection, modes of transmission, signs and symptoms and methods to prevent the contact with the virus. Based on the available literature, the early symptoms include fever, a dry cough, sore throat, shortness of breath leading to trouble in breathing, mucus, or phlegm in bronchial secretions with fatigue, body aches, and loss of appetite being the additive symptoms. WHO and CDC have proposed the mode of transmission of infection is mainly due to contact of the aerosols from an infected person. Due to the droplet spread and increasing fatality, there is a lot of fear and anxiety to treat patients in the dental clinic, as dental operatory is where contact with infected persons is deemed very close.[3],[4] Hence, there are many questions about how to manage patients in the dental operatory. How to deal with the aerosols that are most common with simple to complex dental procedures? WHO, OSHA, CDC have proposed guidelines to manage dental operatory most effectively.[5] In the available literature and recent articles, we have seen many recommendations, knowledge, and doctors' perceptions of the COVID-19 pandemic. Do we know how a dental nurse practitioner and front-line worker manage to provide the utmost care and the risk they incur to facilitate infection free treatment? We need to understand how the dental nurses and front-line health workers in a dental clinic prepare to prioritize patient appointments based on emergency. The checklist they go through before scheduling an appointment, the rules and regulations to be followed during and post-treatment. There is no doubt that teledentistry could be a possible solution for better and safe practice in dentistry.[4],[5] The dental nurse has a crucial role in the dental operatory, and it is challenging to perform dental treatment without the help of a dental nurse. The concept of a four-handed dentistry protocol established the role of dental nurse in dental practice. Moreover, the concept of telenursing could defiantly useful in the dental operator, and this aid would benefit both the dental practitioner and patient.

Acknowledgment

Author would like to thank Dentalwriteups team for their help in preparing manuscript.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Chakeri A, Jalali E, Ghadi MR, Mohamadi M. Evaluating the effect of nurse-led telephone follow-ups (tele-nursing) on the anxiety levels in people with coronavirus. J Family Med Prim Care 2020;9:5351-4.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration. https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/covid-19/dentistry.html  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Kampf G, Todt D, Pfaender S, Steinmann E. Persistence of coronaviruses on inanimate surfaces and their inactivation with biocidal agents. J Hosp Infect 2020;104:246-51.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Bhumireddy JC, Mallineni SK, Nuvvula S. Challenges and possible solutions in dental practice during and post COVID-19. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2020;7:1-3.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Mallineni SK, Innes NP, Raggio DP, Araujo MP, Robertson MD, Jayaraman J. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Characteristics in children and considerations for dentists providing their care. Int J Paediatr Dent 2020;30:245-50.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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