Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 297--300

Birth preparedness and complication readiness in pregnant women attending urban tertiary care hospital


Vasundhara Kamineni, Anuradha D Murki, Venkata Lakshmi Kota 
 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, KAMS and RC, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Anuradha D Murki
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, KAMS and RC, LB Nagar, Hyderabad, Telangana
India

Background: Birth preparedness and complication readiness (BP/CR) is a strategy to promote the timely use of skilled maternal and neonatal care and is based on the theory that preparing for childbirth and being ready for complications reduce delay in obtaining care. Study Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence and predictors of birth preparedness, knowledge on danger signs, and emergency readiness among pregnant women attending outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital. Patients and Methods: Six hundred pregnant women attending the outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital for the first time in an urban setting were interviewed using a tool adapted from the “Monitoring BP/CR-tools and indicators for maternal and new born health” of the “JHPIEGO.” The outcomes of the study were birth preparedness, knowledge of severe illness, and emergency readiness. Results: Six hundred pregnant women were in the study. Mean age of respondents was 25.2 (±4) years. The mean gestation at enrolment was 18.7 ± 8 weeks. Among the women who participated in the survey, 20% were illiterate, 70% were homemakers and nearly 70% had a monthly family income >Rs. 15,197 (n = 405). Three hundred and sixteen mothers (52%) were primigravida. As defined in the study, 71.5% were birth prepared. However, 59 women (9.8%) did not identify a place of delivery, 102 (17%) had not started saving money, and 99 mothers (16.5%) were not aware of purchasing materials needed for delivery. The predictors of birth preparedness are multiparity (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–3.1), registration in the antenatal clinic in the first trimester (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.2–6.1), educational status of women (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2–3.0), and pregnancy supervison by a doctor (OR: 5, 95% CI: 2.8–6.6). One hundred and sixty-four women (27%) made no arrangements in the event of an emergency, 376 women (63%) were not aware of their blood group, and 89% (n = 531) did not identify any blood donor. Only 20% (n = 120), 15.8% (n = 95), and 12% (n = 73) of the respondents had knowledge of at least 3 danger signs of pregnancy, labor, and severe illness in newborn, respectively. Conclusions: Nearly three-fourth pregnant women attending a tertiary care hospital in an urban area are birth prepared. However, emergency readiness and awareness of danger signs are very poor. Maternal education and early booking have an independent association with birth preparedness.


How to cite this article:
Kamineni V, Murki AD, Kota VL. Birth preparedness and complication readiness in pregnant women attending urban tertiary care hospital.J Family Med Prim Care 2017;6:297-300


How to cite this URL:
Kamineni V, Murki AD, Kota VL. Birth preparedness and complication readiness in pregnant women attending urban tertiary care hospital. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2017 [cited 2021 Sep 23 ];6:297-300
Available from: https://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2017;volume=6;issue=2;spage=297;epage=300;aulast=Kamineni;type=0