Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 221--228

Mammography uptake among the female staff of King Saud University


Sulaiman Abdullah Alshammari1, Ali Mohsen Alhazmi1, Hanan Awad Alenazi2, Hotoon Sulaiman Alshammari3, Abdullah Mohammed Alshahrani4 
1 Health Promotion and Health Education Research Chair, Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Saudi Health Council, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 College of Medicine, Almaarefa University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, Bisha University, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Sulaiman Abdullah Alshammari
Health Promotion and Health Education Research Chair, Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia

Background: Breast cancer is having a major impact on women's health worldwide. Early detection is the best defense against the associated morbidity and mortality of the disease. Objectives: To assess the level of mammography uptake among working Saudi women and identify the obstacles and barriers that negatively affect it. In addition, to identify the most effective sources of breast-cancer-related information and early detection screening. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional study of women employees of King Saud University aged 40 years and above on March–May 2015 using a self-report questionnaire. Results: A total of 229 participants were recruited from the female staff of King Saud University. Of the participants, 34% were aged 41 years or above, approximately 66% were married, 53.3% had a bachelor's degree, and 61.1% worked as administrators; further, 64.6% had a history of breastfeeding. The rate of mammography uptake was 51.5%. Univariate logistic regression indicated that age, education, and being single predict the rate of mammography uptake. However, multivariate logistic regression indicated that earlier age significantly predicts a higher risk of a low rate of mammography uptake. The main obstacle negatively affecting mammography uptake was ineligible criteria (21.8%). The main sources of information regarding breast cancer were awareness campaigns and television and radio (45.4% and 43.7%, respectively). Conclusion: The participants' rate of mammography uptake, awareness of mammograms, the risk factors, and signs of breast cancer were low. To improve breast-cancer mortality rates in Saudi Arabia, earlier detection of breast cancer through increasing awareness of mammograms is of paramount importance.


How to cite this article:
Alshammari SA, Alhazmi AM, Alenazi HA, Alshammari HS, Alshahrani AM. Mammography uptake among the female staff of King Saud University.J Family Med Prim Care 2020;9:221-228


How to cite this URL:
Alshammari SA, Alhazmi AM, Alenazi HA, Alshammari HS, Alshahrani AM. Mammography uptake among the female staff of King Saud University. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 May 17 ];9:221-228
Available from: https://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2020;volume=9;issue=1;spage=221;epage=228;aulast=Alshammari;type=0