Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 2950--2957

Parental acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccination for adolescent girls in Lagos, Nigeria


Kabiru A Rabiu1, Taiwo G Alausa2, Fatimat M Akinlusi1, Nosimot O Davies3, Khadijah A Shittu2, Oluwarotimi Ireti Akinola1 
1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos State, Nigeria
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos State, Nigeria
3 Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos University College of Medicine, Idi-Araba, Lagos State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Kabiru A Rabiu
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos State
Nigeria

Background and Aims: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is recommended for adolescent girls and would offer a long-term solution to cervical cancer especially in developing countries. However, parental perception and acceptance is a critical success factor. This study examined the degree of parental acceptance of HPV vaccination for adolescent secondary-school girls in Lagos, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey of adolescent girls' parents was undertaken in two urban and two rural secondary schools in Lagos. Univariate and multivariate analysis were carried out using logistic regression to determine correlates of parental acceptance of HPV vaccine. Results: Of the 318 respondents, 45.9% had poor knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV infection, whereas 29.6% had good knowledge. Majority (54.7%) also had poor knowledge of HPV vaccine, whereas 26.7% had good knowledge. Most (72%) would vaccinate their daughters if vaccines were free, whereas only 35.5% would, if not free. Poor knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV infection significantly reduced the likelihood of vaccination even if free (adjusted odds ratio [OR] =0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.24–0.94; P = 0.0325), whereas good knowledge of HPV vaccines (adjusted OR = 6.11; 95% CI = 1.37–27.34; P = 0.018) and tertiary education in the mother (adjusted OR = 29.17; 95% CI = 3.98–214.08; P = 0.0009) increased the likelihood, if not free. Conclusion: HPV vaccination was acceptable to most parents only if offered free. Poor knowledge of cervical cancer, HPV infection, and vaccine may hinder acceptability. It is recommended that HPV vaccination is offered free through the National Programme on Immunization in Nigeria.


How to cite this article:
Rabiu KA, Alausa TG, Akinlusi FM, Davies NO, Shittu KA, Akinola OI. Parental acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccination for adolescent girls in Lagos, Nigeria.J Family Med Prim Care 2020;9:2950-2957


How to cite this URL:
Rabiu KA, Alausa TG, Akinlusi FM, Davies NO, Shittu KA, Akinola OI. Parental acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccination for adolescent girls in Lagos, Nigeria. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Oct 25 ];9:2950-2957
Available from: https://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2020;volume=9;issue=6;spage=2950;epage=2957;aulast=Rabiu;type=0