Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 3707--3711

Extent of and influences on knowledge of Alzheimer's disease among undergraduate medical students


Abdulaziz M Shadid1, Abdulrahman Yousef Aldayel2, Asem Shadid2, Ali M Alqaraishi2, Maha M Gholah2, Fay A Almughiseeb2, Yara Abdullah Alessa2, Haima F Alani3, Salah Ud Din Khan4, Saleh Algarni5 
1 College of Medicine, King Saud University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 College of Medicine, Al Imam Mohammad ibn Saud Islamic University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
3 College of Medicine, Near East University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
5 Department of Clinical Neurosciences, College of Medicine, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Asem Shadid
College of Medicine, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Othman Bin Affan Rd. Al-Nada.7544, Riyadh - 13317.4233
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major health problem, which is of increasing concern because of rising yearly incidence and estimated cost. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential to manage AD effectively and improve the outcomes. Inadequate knowledge can delay the diagnosis. General practitioners should play a more effective role in the identification and diagnosis of AD, and medical education is key to solving this issue. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the knowledge of undergraduate medical students and to identify the factors that influenced their knowledge. Methods: This study used a quantitative cross-sectional evaluation of 327 Saudi Arabian medical students from the first and final years in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, who participated in an online survey via email between March and May 2018. Knowledge of AD was assessed using the 12-item AD Knowledge Test for Health Professionals from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB ADKT). General linear models were used to identify the most significant influence on AD knowledge scores. Results: Only 10.73% of first-year and 33.33% of final-year students scored ≥ 50% on the UAB ADKT. Students pursuing specialties related to AD (adult neurology, geriatrics, or psychiatry) and students aged ≥ 27 years had higher scores (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Undergraduate medical students lacked proper knowledge of AD, suggesting that improvements in education programs can help. Future studies are needed to assess the quality and effectiveness of AD education in the curriculum of Saudi medical schools.


How to cite this article:
Shadid AM, Aldayel AY, Shadid A, Alqaraishi AM, Gholah MM, Almughiseeb FA, Alessa YA, Alani HF, Khan S, Algarni S. Extent of and influences on knowledge of Alzheimer's disease among undergraduate medical students.J Family Med Prim Care 2020;9:3707-3711


How to cite this URL:
Shadid AM, Aldayel AY, Shadid A, Alqaraishi AM, Gholah MM, Almughiseeb FA, Alessa YA, Alani HF, Khan S, Algarni S. Extent of and influences on knowledge of Alzheimer's disease among undergraduate medical students. J Family Med Prim Care [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jan 24 ];9:3707-3711
Available from: https://www.jfmpc.com/article.asp?issn=2249-4863;year=2020;volume=9;issue=7;spage=3707;epage=3711;aulast=Shadid;type=0